Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

One of of the changes I was most excited about in our house makeover was to change our exterior doors to Dutch doors. I knew from the very start I wanted a Dutch door. Two Dutch doors, to be exact. Twins. One for the front door, and one for our side/kitchen door. I don’t know why they are called Dutch doors, perhaps you have a different name for them. I’ve heard some people call them “friendly doors” and I like that. It suits them well.

I actually had a Dutch door as my front door in one of my old homes. We also had one in a laundry room growing up, so this isn’t the first time I’ve had one! Perhaps that’s another reason I was so drawn to Dutch doors. I love being surrounded by things that evoke happy memories. It’s the little things, right? Actually, Dutch doors were kind of a big thing for me!

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

The previous kitchen door wasn’t exactly what I’d call “friendly” (except to perhaps a cat). The bars made me feel a bit like I was in jail, and the glass in the door itself was actually plastic. So, needless to say, I’m pretty tickled with our new doors!

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

Dutch Door Dreams

I think wood Dutch doors are not only among the friendliest and most charming style of doors, particularly for a cottage or farmhouse inspired home, but they are also quite practical, too! We open one or both of ours every single day at one point or another (or all day) to let the breezes flow through.

Opening the Dutch doors in the morning or later evenings to get cross breezes flowing will feel especially wonderful in the summer. It’s so nice to be able to open the top and know the dogs will stay safely inside (Jack’s far too much of a scaredy cat to jump over). Best of all, deliveries are so much less stressful when we can just open the top part and grab a package without the dogs attempting an escape or scaring the delivery person.

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

Bugs & Dutch Doors?

I realize that many people live in areas where bugs are a problem (eek!). I’ve heard from many readers who can’t imagine how we could leave a door open!

Well, if you are new here and wondering, we live in the city of Seattle and we really don’t have bug issues. I know! It’s become an additional reason I love living here, now that I’ve heard all of my readers bug concerns, ha. Not to say we don’t get a fly now and then, or a bee buzzing through the house. But it’s not a big (a bug?) issue.

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

But, the good news for those of you in buggy areas is I think you can STILL consider a Dutch door. Don’t let bugs steal the joy! It would be quite easy to use a screen door and still have a Dutch door. Yes, maybe it would not be as cute with a screen from the outside in particular, but I bet there are some nice retractable screens that you could just pull out when you needed it.

I would check with a local door store on screen options. A Dutch door is really like any other door, you can definitely have a screen.

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

Where can you get a Dutch Door?

The most common question I get about my doors (next to the bug worries) is where did I find such adorable doors? We searched high and low for our dream door. I wanted a chunky door, solid wood with nine windows.

When our contractor mentioned a local door store, we didn’t have high hopes but went to take a look. SURPRISE! There it was! A wood Dutch door, in all its glory. The “X” lower, the nine divided light windows. It was perfect.

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ
Our doors came from a store called “Franks” in Seattle. You could ask a local contractor for advise or look for door and window companies in your area (or even check with a home improvement store).

I originally was considering a Dutch door I found online here. It looks really nice, not the same style as mine (and more expensive!), but still lovely.

Customizing the Dutch Door

It only took a couple of weeks to have our Dutch doors custom made and another week to have them painted (the store had sample doors in stock to look at, but they are custom built or modified for you). Besides various sizes and styles, they also had customizing options such as different glass, hinges, and which direction they open, so keep that in mind, as well.

We chose clear glass because I prefer to see outside and it lets in a lot more light than other types of glass.

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQPatio Fountain Details and A Giveaway

Details on our Dutch Doors

Keep in mind that our doors are both protected under porch cover so they stay dry. You’ll want to consult with your contractor or door professional if you have questions about what type of door material you need for durability in your climate and install situation. My doors are Fir or Hemlock (can’t remember which, but I LOVE solid wood doors!) and came pre-hung and weather stripped.

Dutch Door Paint & Colors

We had our doors professionally painted (through a partner of the door store) prior to install, just because I didn’t want to deal with it. It wasn’t cheap to have them painted, but I thought it was worth it to have a nice quality paint finish (especially since it was winter time). They even color matched our choice of colors (see our door paint colors below) from a paint swatch.

Our doors are the same color on each side (but you can have them painted differently on both sides if you want to!). We decided on a deep navy for our kitchen door (so it would be a high contrast in the white kitchen). We chose a neutral light/medium gray for the front door. We wanted there to be some contrast, but we didn’t want it feel like a black hole at the end of our narrow entry hall.

The specific colors we used are listed below.

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

It was so cold when we were remodeling, so having the doors arrive painted and ready to install was ideal for us. Our contractor installed the doors for us, too, so that was a bonus.

As far as hardware, you can find the exact hardware we used, linked below.

Our new doors make our house feel like a totally different place. And we couldn’t be happier with the change! 

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

PAINT COLORS:

Front gray door: Ozark Shadows by Benjamin Moore

Side navy door: Blue Note by Benjamin Moore

Where We Got Our Dutch Doors + FAQ

DUTCH DOOR SOURCE:

Ours is from Frank Lumber the Door Store in Seattle

An online Dutch door source here.

DUTCH DOOR HARDWARE:

Dutch door doorknob: Baldwin

Dutch door latch: Deltana

Related Posts:

Dreaming of a Dutch Door (lots of pretty door inspiration)

Signature Style: My Dutch Door Plans

Our Entry Hallway Makeover (progress)

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

Carrara Gioia Quartz

Today I thought I could offer a few more details on my Quartz countertops, as they have become one of my most FAQ on the kitchen remodel! I totally understand why; trying to decide on countertops is a stressful experience.

Perhaps sharing our own decision making process will help alleviate your concerns or give you some new ideas, now or down the road!

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

Early on in our design process, we considered all the possibilities for our countertops. Everything from wood (which we used in our English Tudor) to marble to quartz to concrete to a mix of materials.

Because our kitchen is bright and VERY sunny at certain times of the day, we ruled out wood since we worried it would potentially fade or crack as well as feel too dark for our space. Concrete was out once we decided on concrete looking floors. We also decided against a mix of materials. Because it’s such a small kitchen, we felt like a streamlined look of consistent counters would look the best.

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

I happen to LOVE marble countertops. I had them in a bathroom in one of our homes and thought they were so beautiful! But it is true what they say, they are sensitive.

We had a little friend visiting our house one time and he set a red popsicle on our counters. We never forgot that visit because forevermore our counter had an etched and pink stain to help us remember it! Honestly, those marks never bothered me. I think marble is beautiful as it ages. But not everyone has the same tolerance, so it’s really a personal decision.

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

Even this time we considered marble countertops again, but my husband let me know he really wanted quartz. He has stained our marble baking slabs by setting beets on them, so I understand his concern. :) He loves to cook but he really didn’t want to feel like he had to be cautious about beets or foods that could etch when cooking.

I like to limit our household stress levels, ha, so we agreed to stick with quartz. We had quartz counters in our last home’s kitchen and they were pretty awesome, so I really didn’t have any reservations. It is a super strong composite stone material and can be so lovely, too.

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

The quartz we had in our old house was Caesarstone Organic White. We had tried to avoid any obvious swirly pattern on our counters in that house because our hickory wood floors already had a lot of “movement” and a rustic vibe to them. We didn’t feel our counters should compete, so anything with a marble look felt wrong.

But this house, I was excited to look for a marble alternative. Our floors are a porcelain tile that looks like concrete, so I was excited about the contrast between the look of the counters and the concrete.

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

It wasn’t as easy as I had hoped to find a quartz we liked. Every quartz pattern we saw felt wrong. Either I felt like someone drew all over the slab with a pencil, or the coloring wasn’t right for our home. We also wanted a more “grayed” look, nothing too shiny, not too stark and not too yellow. We also wanted a subtle random pattern. Picky much? :)

The other piece of the puzzle was that we needed a 2cm quartz in order to fit under our windows. The best way to get the counters to fit and have a seamless look was to have a thinner countertop (rather than needing to cut down cabinets to a less than standard height).

For years I had preferred the look of thicker marble countertops, so I wasn’t too sure I was going to be happy with thinner. But after lots of research, I decided that I was actually going to love the look of the 2cm in our home! YAY!

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

But I still couldn’t find a marble-looking quartz that I liked. We just about gave up when our contractor suggested we try Carrara Gioia Quartz at Daltile. I had no idea that Daltile had quartz, but we ran over to their warehouse to take a look. Not only did we love it, but the 2cm was going to be in stock so we didn’t have to wait and could select our favorite slabs.

I dreamed of my countertops not only fitting seamlessly under the window, but also of a long expanse of uninterrupted counter space all the way around the corner of the kitchen.

It is not a big kitchen, but I think the seamless look of uninterrupted counters help the space to feel larger and be so much more functional.

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

We’ve lived with our new Quartz counters for five months now and still love them! They are super easy to clean and take care of, too (we use Thieves cleaner on them for those who are curious)!

Are you looking for new countertops?

Have you tried quartz?

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative

Related Posts:

Galley Kitchen Reveal

Kitchen Source List

Carrara Gioia Quartz: Marble Alternative
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